Breeding program at Ree Park | International breeding program

For the protection of
wildlife 

 

Ree Park Safaris main purpose is the active effort for the conservation of endangered animals.  

Collaboration

across borders  

 

Several of our endangered species are a part of special breeding programs called ESB and EEP. These are international collaborations where European zoos and safari parks work together across borders to secure wildlife conservation.

Most of the animals that are participating in these special breeding programs, can be seen in their enclosures, when you explore the park. There are other species like birds of prey that require special conditions and therefore the breeding work takes place behind the scene, where visitors mainly have no access. 

International

breeding programs

When Ree Park Safari makes an active effort for the preservation of the world's endangered animals, it is done in collaboration with other Danish and European players in the industry. When you visit the park you will occasionally read abbreviations like EEP and ESB. ESB stands for European Stud Book, a pedigree where all individual animals and species are registered. EEP is an abbreviation for European Endangered Species Program. That is the official European breeding program for the conservation of endangered species. The EU and the EEP in practice The European zoos are doing a great job behind the scenes to preserve endangered species. For annual conferences, the situation of the different species is assessed, based on research, real numbers and experience. If an animal species is threatened it will be initially classified as an ESB art. In practice, this means special focus on the species. After being a classified “ESB animal” for a while, the species can be elevated to an EEP species if it is considered that the species continues to be threatened and the trend for the species is advancing. In practice, this means that there is a definite certain breeding plan for the species. For each EEP animal species, there is one coordinator who is the rope keeper for the breeding work. The EEP coordinator decides, among other things, which individuals are mating, and which animals are moving from one zoo to another. That means it isn’t our decision which EEP classified animals are living with us at Ree Park Safari, it’s all determined by the coordinator. You could say that the boundaries between the individual zoos are raised and no one owns the individual animals.

"...did you know that endangered animal species are being located on the behalf of the animals wellbeing and not what the individual zoos would like the most?"

ESB animals

European Stud Book  

Ring tailied lemur

Yellow-throated marten

Marabou

Southern Ground Hornbill (non-accessible aviary)  

 

Ring tailied lemur

Ring tailed lemur

Yellow-throated marten 

Yellow-throated marten

Marabou

Marabou

Southern Ground Hornbill

 

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18. august 2017
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